Brain Injury, Bladder and Bowel Function (Incontinence)

Brain Injury Australia

Brain injury may affect bladder and/or bowel function (incontinence). Following brain injury, a person may need assistance re-establishing and keeping regular bowel movements and/or emptying the bladder. People with very severe/catastrophic brain injury, or spinal cord injury with traumatic brain injury, may be especially affected by incontinence. However, most people with a brain injury don’t have a permanent problem managing … Read More

Personal Insurance, Superannuation and Brain Injury

Brain Injury Australia

Fact Sheets relating to superannuation, personal insurance and brain injury, prepared with assistance from Maurice Blackburn. Many people are unaware that they have disability and death benefits from their super or insurance. It is important to maximise any benefits you can claim. If you cannot work because of a brain injury you may not be able to live off your … Read More

Acquired Brain Injury in Australia – Statistics

Brain Injury Australia

The Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) estimates that the Australian population amounts to just under 19 million people. Of those 19 million Australians, the 1998 ABS study on Disability, Ageing and Carers estimated that there were 3.6 million people with a disability (19% of the total population). The 1999 Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) study on The definition, … Read More

Acquired Brain Injury and Mental Illness Services in Australia

Brain Injury Australia

A major disadvantage for people with acquired brain injury is that there is no legislated form of assistance as there is for people with mental illness. Unless people with acquired brain injury have the ongoing support of a good network of family and friends, they find it difficult to obtain any form of assistance. As a consequence, their psychosocial functioning … Read More

Acquired Brain Injury and Criminal Behaviour in Australia

Brain Injury Australia

Available empirical evidence suggests that damage to the frontal and temporal lobes of the brain is associated with an increase in the potential for aggressive, violent and criminal behaviour. Individuals with frontal lobe damage may: have short attention spans; have difficulty regulating emotional responses and inhibiting impulses; have difficulty switching behaviour when necessary and empathising with others; are unable to … Read More

Acquired Brain Injury and Family Violence in Australia

Brain Injury Australia

Studies have found that in a relationship in which one partner has an acquired brain injury the chances of marital aggression are increased almost sixfold. The correlation between acquired brain injury and a propensity for domestic violence has important implications for therapy interventions. The identification of acquired brain injury in men who commit domestic violence, would allow behavioural and cognitive … Read More

Alcohol, Drugs and Acquired Brain Injury

Brain Injury Australia

There is a need for increased awareness of acquired brain injury in alcohol and other drug (A&D) services. In 1995, a Victorian survey of A&D and ABI agencies funded by the Department of Human Services provided evidence that there is limited understanding of the support needs of people with an acquired brain injury who also have alcohol and drug problems. … Read More

Brain Injury and Homelessness

Brain Injury Australia

An acquired brain injury can exacerbate and magnify the risk factors associated with homelessness including family breakdown, loss of social support networks, lack of affordable housing, family violence, unemployment, illness, drug and alcohol use, violence and/or criminal behaviour. Research shows that: People who experience a traumatic brain injury are at risk of homelessness where one or all of the following … Read More

Homelessness and Brain Injury

Brain Injury Australia

The 1999 Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW study) on “The definition, incidence and prevalence of Acquired Brain Injury in Australia” estimated that there were 338,700 Australians who had a disability related to Acquired Brain Injury. Of these, 160,000 were severely or profoundly affected by Acquired Brain Injury thus needing daily support. The 1993 ABS statistics on which this … Read More